Kirkland Legal Update: Managerial Battler Gets Ugly

U.S. Flag

The legal battle involving junior middleweight James Kirkland is getting ugly. As previously reported, there are separate ongoing lawsuits, filed in Los Angeles and Texas, pertaining to the managerial and promotional contracts of Kirkland.

In Los Angeles federal court, Kirkland alleges that Golden Boy Promotions illegally extended his contracts beyond sports commission limits. Kirkland is also looking to break his managerial agreements with Cameron Dunkin and Michael Miller.

“The promoter agreement states it is in accord with all ‘applicable commission rules and regulations,” according to the complaint.

It further states that “in the event, Kirkland fails or is unable to perform the promoter has the right to extend the promoter agreement for the applicable period of time.”

“The promoter agreement further states if Kirkland wins a major world title, the promoter agreement shall be extended for the term of 5 additional bouts and if Kirkland extends any media contract, the promoter agreement shall be extended for the like period.” In the same paragraph, it states “in no event shall the term of this agreement extend beyond the maximum term permitted by any applicable law or regulation.”

Dunkin and Miller were anticipating a legal strike by Kirkland – and filed their own lawsuit, along with Kirkland’s trainers Ann Wolfe and Donald “Pops” Billingsly, in the District Court of Bexar County, Texas.

On Monday morning, Kirkland’s co-counsels, Sekou Gary and Charles H. Peckham filed their answer, with several counter-claims.

In the answer, obtained by BoxingScene.com, Kirkland’s legal team blasted Miller and Dunkin with the following.

“The management agreement itself is a hodge-podge of terms, many not complying with laws under which and for which it was written and is full of typos and grammatical disagreements. It appears to be the cut-and-paste job of the lowest quality and of little legal effect if any.”

Kirkland’s attorney, Sekou Gary, advised BoxingScene that his client’s managerial contract violates the Nevada law by exceeding the “time allowed” under the legal regulations in the state. Kirkland, according to the papers, could potentially see himself bound until January 18, 2018 – pursuant to various clauses and extensions in the managerial agreement.

Article Link

Categories